Hypodermic Needle Damage

August 2, 1999

by Robert McDowell

I came across today another case of the Jugular Vein being severely damaged during a Vitamin Injection.

If one considers how important is that Vein and of course how easy to access, it is down right irresponsible of a Vet or other handler to have carelessly injected something into it causing damage. This especially, since in the two cases I have dealt with recently, the only reason for giving the shot in the first place was as a "general boost or as something else to put on the bill. Maybe there is something about the Vitamin Shots, which makes them more dangerous to veins than other injectables?

To deal with this situation I have formulated a treatment response internally and externally which is as follows:

The Internal Treatment is a variation of the Tendon and Bone Healing program to stimulate the repair of the connective and other tissues involved. This treatment contains Millet, Linseed, Yarrow, Nettle, Rue in the dried herb form and Comfrey and Hawthorne in Cider Vinegar Extract form, to which is added Rescue Remedy.

The rationale for this formulation is to provide both the nutrients and the impetus to healing and the re-establishment of a healthy Vein wall while at the same time promoting the re-absorption of the scar tissue resultant from the injury, and treating for shock.

The External Treatment consists of two parts. Firstly, a 5% Witch Hazel cream in a Sorbelene base as an external astringent tonic. This is applied to the vein itself to promote tone and elasticity in the local area daily in the morning. Secondly, in the afternoon the Witch Hazel was alternated with my Hoof Oil treatment, which is applied to promote local healing while providing stimulation to circulation and anti-inflammatory action topically to the site.

Caution: In the first instance this external application is done very, very gently, merely spreading the formulations along the length of the damaged section and beyond. After about three weeks they may be rubbed in a little more firmly but still with great care. After the vein seems completely restored they may be massaged in more vigorously still, to further strengthen, tone and to stimulate the full efficiency of the vein.

The results of this program are often dramatic. Damage, which had been regarded as permanent has resolved itself within 6 weeks to the amazement of all concerned and sufficiently so, as to be only noticeable under close examination. Further, in a Western Australian case in March of this year, testing showed the full restoration of blood flow through the vein at the end of 8 weeks treatment in a racer who had been judged to have permanently lost 60% of the blood flow.

Before someone else (or you) stick a needle into your horses Jugular or any other vein, recognise the possibility of serious injury and ask yourself what are you really trying to achieve. Recognise the danger to the vein itself and remember that any injection at all administers a grave shock the immune system of the animal.

In the modern age we have completely forgotten that our immune systems were not designed to deal with the shock of a foreign substance appearing without warning in the blood stream. If there is one thing as much to blame as anything else for the general depletion of our immune systems in the 20th Century it is the hypodermic needle itself forgetting for the moment, what was in it.

If an injury occurs while you are standing there, immediately give Rescue Remedy orally and provide some sort of astringent action to the area, Lemon Juice or even just Cold Water if nothing else is to hand. Witch Hazel Ointment or even After-shave Lotion are better still, for first aid application. Do not apply Arnica at this stage.

Give regular additional doses of Rescue Remedy for the next few days while establishing the routine of alternate astringent and healing applications as described above taking care not to do any further damage by rubbing.

Start immediately with suitable herbal supplements added to the diet as listed above, and continue the whole treatment for 3 or 4 weeks after the damage has been completely resolved.

By all means test for blood flow if you wish, but Don't Wait For Tests, it is obvious that there is damage. Act immediately to shorten recovery time.

When it is all under control, take to task whoever did the damage and insist that in future you be consulted and that you are present at any time any such intravenous treatment is administered.

 

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