Aust wild horses strike gold in newly minted $100 coin

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Perth Mint's $100 gold coin, the second in its Brumby series.
Perth Mint’s $100 gold coin, the second in its Brumby series.

A gold $100 coin featuring a wild horse has been added to Perth Mint’s Australian Brumby selection.

Only 250 of the 99.99% pure gold 1oz coins have been minted and they are expected to sell out fast.

Designed by graphic artist Jennifer McKenna, the reverse side portrays the brumby as “a magnificent, unfettered beast, galloping with abandon through water”. The Perth Mint’s P mintmark, the weight, fineness, and the year 2021 also appear just under the primary design.

The Commonwealth effigy of Queen Elizabeth II created by British engraver Jody Clark is seen on the obverse along with the coins’ denomination, which is included beneath the Queen’s likeness.

Accompanied by a numbered Certificate of Authenticity, the coin is housed in a classic display case which comes in an illustrated shipping box symbolising a brumby galloping across high country. It is being sold for $A3900.

Last year a 99.99% pure 2oz $2 silver Brumby coin was produced, with 1000 minted.

Australian brumbies have adapted to the rugged conditions of the Australian Alps. They are national icons seen by many as symbolic of the country’s national character.

Accompanied by a numbered Certificate of Authenticity, the coin is housed in a classic display case which comes in an illustrated shipper symbolising a brumby galloping across high country.
Accompanied by a numbered Certificate of Authenticity, the coin is housed in a classic display case which comes in an illustrated shipper symbolising a brumby galloping across high country.

A “brumby” is the term for wild or feral horses in Australia. The origins of the name are unclear, and there are several possibilities. It could derive from an Aboriginal word “baroomby” meaning “wild” in the language of the Pitjara Indigenous Australians on the Warrego and Nogoa Rivers in southern Queensland.

Other sources say that the early feral horses were descendants from those left behind by Sergeant James Brumby from his property at Mulgrave Place in New South Wales, when he left for Tasmania in 1804, and yet another relates to Baramba, a creek and station in the Queensland district of Burnett, established in the 1840s and later abandoned, leaving many of the horses to escape into the wild. It has also been suggested that the name derives from the Irish word bromach or bromaigh, meaning “colt”.

The obverse side of the Brumby coin has a Jody Clark effigy of H.M. Queen Elizabeth II.

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