Charity calls for ban on donkey skin trade

Share
Brooke USA has helped hundreds of women and their donkeys in Kenya.
A working donkey in Kenya. © Brooke USA

A petition by working equine charity Brooke is calling for a ban on the trade of donkey skins across East Africa.

The petition is calling on the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), a trade bloc across East Africa, to ban the trade of donkey skins across the entire region.

It is aiming for 10,000 signatures and is already more than halfway to its target.

IGAD acts as a regional government for Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan and Uganda. Like the European Union (EU), IGAD harmonises policy across the region and facilitates conversations between member countries to collaboratively form and implement solutions to key developmental issues.

Home to the highest donkey population in the world, the region has become a hotspot for donkey skin traders and has the highest number of slaughterhouses in Africa, currently six. Donkeys are killed for their skins in order to fulfil the growing demand for ejiao, a gelatin used in traditional Chinese medicine and beauty products.

Pressure from Brooke supporters has already helped secure a ban in Kenya and working with IGAD will allow Brooke to have an even wider impact; shutting down the entire region and keeping donkey populations and livelihoods safe.

With the donkey skin trade there are major impacts in terms of both animal welfare and the livelihoods of animal owners. Donkeys are a vital part of the working livestock sector and support the livelihoods of thousands of people in East Africa. Currently, restrictions on the donkey skin trade are inconsistent and traders are able to exploit areas where the laws and enforcement are weakest, leaving donkeys at risk.

» More on Brooke’s fight against the donkey skin trade.

 

One thought on “Charity calls for ban on donkey skin trade

  • February 26, 2021 at 5:33 pm
    Permalink

    Great news! Need to get this trade stopped, not just for the donkeys but also for the 600 million people who depend on them to survive.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *