Meeting a horse’s basic needs often a balancing act

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Fulfilling the horse’s basic needs are essential to ensuring a happy, healthy equine partner, and while most people agree on what these needs are, there are often differences in opinion over their relative importance and how much of each is needed.

In the latest episode of Equine Science Talk, Professor Konstanze Krüger, Dr Isabell Marr and Dr Laureen Esch look into the scientific research and what it tells us about how these needs can best be met. They discuss such questions as whether a paddock box offers a suitable alternative to group turnout, the pros and cons of haynets, and how to address the issue of horses that are aggressive towards their neighbours, both in the box and in the field.

In the modern, domestic setting, providing an optimum balance is impossible, and compromises will always have to be made, so the team discuss the priorities and how to make the best use of the available facilities.

The video channel Equine Science Talk International has been created by three German equine scientists who debunk horse behaviour myths and answer some of the most common questions asked by horse owners.

Krüger is Germany’s first professor of equine science and specialist in horse behaviour and cognition; Marr is a horse trainer and instructor; and Esch is a veterinarian and equine dentist. Their combined expertise gives unique insights into equine science and its practical application.

The videos have been translated from the original German by Austrian-based journalist Kate Farmer, a horse trainer and independent equine behaviour researcher.

Watch more from Equine Science Talk International:

Horsetalk.co.nz

Latest research and information from the horse world.

One thought on “Meeting a horse’s basic needs often a balancing act

  • January 23, 2021 at 9:05 am
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    ‘In the modern, domestic setting, providing an optimum balance is impossible, and compromises will always have to be made, so the team discuss the priorities and how to make the best use of the available facilities.’ So basically these people are claiming that since we have been treating horses abysmally for ages, there is no reason to improve horse-keeping and/or breeding facilities? That is rationalization of current practices not research.

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