Cowboy art collection fetches $US20 million at auction

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Indian Love Call by Newell Convers Wyeth fetched $US3.15 million at a sale of art from the colledction of T. Boone Pickens.
Indian Love Call by Newell Convers Wyeth fetched $US3.15 million, topping a sale of art from the collection of T. Boone Pickens. © Christie’s

The auction in New York of the cowboy art and collectables owned by the late oilman T. Boone Pickens fetched more than $US20 million.

Sold by Christie’s on Wednesday, topping the “The Legend of the West: Iconic Works from the T. Boone Pickens Collection” was an oil painting titled Indian Love Call by Newell Convers Wyeth, which fetched $US3.15 million. Its pre-sale estimate was between $US2-3 million. Pickens had bought the piece at Sotheby’s in 2007.

Remington's The Buffalo Signal (If Skulls Could Speak), which has a pre-auction estimate of between $US3m and $5 million.
Remington’s The Buffalo Signal (If Skulls Could Speak), which has a pre-auction estimate of between $US3m and $5 million. © Christie’s

The second highest priced lot was Frederick Remington’s The Buffalo Signal (If Skulls Could Speak), which sold for $2.91 million. Before the sale experts estimated it would go for between $US3m and $5 million. It was completed by Remington in 1903 and acquired by Pickens in 2007.

Other high priced lots included an oil painting by Thomas Moran of Index Peak, Yellowstone, Wyoming, painted in 1913. It sold for $US1.35m, above its pre-auction estimate of $US700,000 to $1 million.

Remington’s bronze sculpture The Broncho Buster sold for $US562,500, while the CM Russell piece titled Roping a Wolf failed to sell up to expectations. The hammer fell at $US635,000, but its pre-sale estimate was between $US700,000 and $US1 million.

Total sales were $US20,423,750.

» Sale results

• Two equestrian artworks painted by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec painted when he was only about 16 sold for a total of $US412,500 at an auction at Christie’s in New York earlier this month.

Cheval de chasse à courre sold for $US225,000, and its sister piece, Cavalier de chasse à courre ressanglant son cheval, fetched $US187,500. Together, the pair were expected to fetch up to $US450,000.

Toulouse-Lautrec painted the two a year apart, in 1879 and 1880. They had been on extended loan at the San Diego Museum of Art from June 2018 to March 2020.

They were among 110 lots in Christie’s Impressionist and Modern Art day sale on October 8, which netted a total of $US9,694,125.

» Sale results

Cheval de chasse à courre, left, and Cavalier de chasse à courre ressanglant son cheval, by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.
Cheval de chasse à courre, left, and Cavalier de chasse à courre ressanglant son cheval, by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. © Christie’s

 

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