Zoo’s Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra stallion dies following attack by son

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Kasane died on October 2.
Kasane died on October 2. © Utica Zoo

Utica Zoo in New York has lost its senior Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra stallion Kasane, who succumbed on Friday to injuries sustained in mid-August.

Kasane had been under veterinary observation since mid-August as a result of incidents of aggression from his son and exhibit mate, Rundu.

“Despite consulting with numerous veterinarians and industry experts, Kasane succumbed to complications from his previous injuries, which were confirmed by necropsy results received from Cornell University,” the zoo said in a statement.

The two stallions had been living in an exhibit for seven years in with three ostriches, two females and a male. But early last month, the two female ostriches, Bina and Bushara, were found dead by zookeepers, with the cause thought to be aggression from Rundu.

“The combination of animal loss in the same exhibit, yet not related in terms of injury, is devastating to the Utica Zoo team, especially the animal care staff who provide genuine attention to all of the animals. Until next Spring at the earliest, Rundu and the Zoo’s male ostrich, Boomer, will remain separated yet jointly viewable in the exhibit at the entrance of African Ridge,” the zoo said.

Hartmann’s mountain zebras are a subspecies of the mountain zebra, which is one of three zebra species. Considered vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, Hartmann’s mountain zebras live in dry mountain habitats of Namibia. Unlike other zebra species, Hartmann’s mountain zebras live in small herds, have vertical stripes on their neck and torso and horizontal stripes on their backside, and have a small fold of skin under their chin (called a dewlap). With fewer than 25,000 individuals left in the wild, the biggest threat to this species’ survival is habitat loss and fragmentation as the result of livestock production and agriculture.

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