Microchipping campaign aims to help disaster-stricken horses

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© Equus Foundation

US-based charity the Equus Foundation is aiming to assist horses caught up in natural disasters with a new microchipping campaign.

News coverage of frantic horses in dense smoke from wildfires has prompted the charity to try to raise $50,000 to microchip 1000 horses under the care of its Equus Foundation Guardians.

“As horse lovers and horse protectors, this is our worst nightmare — horses that are terrified, confused, and unable to find their way home,” said Equus Foundation president Lynn Coakley.

She said that with limited funds available, many charities must choose critical essentials such as food, farrier care and vet care over microchipping.

“With your help, we can make sure that these horses will find their way home after disaster strikes and help alleviate the fear felt by the organizations entrusted with their care,” Coakley said.

A horse watches the fires as fire crews work to build a breakline from the encroaching flames in Ojai, California, in December 2017.
A horse watches the fires as fire crews work to build a breakline from the encroaching flames in Ojai, California, in December 2017. © Joseph Philipson/Equus Foundation

$50 covered the cost of the purchase of one chip and the implantation by a veterinarian. Microchipping is regarded as a humane, ethical, and reliable form of identification. While the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) now requires all competition horses to be microchipped, fewer than 20% of the horses at equine charities across the United States are microchipped.

The price of a chip, plus the veterinary fees, can range from $40-$120, depending on the veterinarian and the cost of the original chip. Inserting a microchip is not an invasive process, and it is very unlikely that a horse will have a reaction.

» Equus Foundation Microchipping Campaign

 

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