Hay airdrop brings aids to Texas animals in Imelda’s aftermath

Cattle in Southeast Texas seeking higher ground in floodwaters caused by excessive rains brought from Tropical Storm Imelda.
Cattle in Southeast Texas seeking higher ground in floodwaters caused by excessive rains brought from Tropical Storm Imelda. © Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Animals affected by Tropical Storm Imelda in Southeast Texas have been rescued, treated and had hay dropped in support.

Tropical Storm Imelda brought more rain and flooding to some coastal areas of Southeast Texas than Hurricane Harvey, which added to the challenges to support crews from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the Prairie View A&M University.

As well as the airdop of hundreds of big square bales of hay, relief teams have also used boats and “high-profile” military and emergency response vehicles to get to stricken animals.

Monty Dozier, AgriLife Extension director for the agency’s Disaster Assessment and Recovery Team said that last week, a total of 1,471 square bales of hay were airdropped, and another 485 square bales and 10 round bales have been delivered via other methods.

Texas A&M's Veterinary Emergency Team estimates it has treated more than 300 animals in recent days.
Texas A&M’s Veterinary Emergency Team estimates it has treated more than 300 animals affected by Tropical Storm Imelda in recent days. © Texas A&M VET/Facebook

Animal shelters established at White’s Park in Chambers County and Ford Park in Jefferson County have provided food, shelter and medical assistance to horses, cattle, goats, dogs and cats.

The Texas A&M Veterinary Emergency Team (VET) has treated more than 300 animals in Chambers County, most of which were pets separated from their owners during the severe flooding.

Support through surveying storm damage was also provided by the agencies to the Texas Division of Emergency Management and Orange and Jasper counties.

Damage assessment reporting has also begun in Jefferson County and will soon begin in Newton County.

“Preliminary damage assessments are required for FEMA to help ensure counties are eligible for federal funds in the event of a presidential emergency declaration,” Dozier said.

Large square hay bales have been airdropped to animals stranded by Tropical Storm Imelda in Texas. 
Large square hay bales have been airdropped to animals stranded by Tropical Storm Imelda in Texas. © Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Horsetalk.co.nz

Latest research and information from the horse world.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *