Royal Vet College sends out first Equine Locomotor Research graduates

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Diploma graduates at the RVC Graduation Ceremony with Amy Barstow, Deputy Course Director (fourth from the left)
Equine Locomotor Research Diploma graduates at the RVC Graduation Ceremony with deputy course director Amy Barstow, fourth from left.

All 12 students of the Royal Veterinary College’s (RVC) new Diploma in Equine Locomotor Research have graduated.

Launched in January 2017, the course is primarily intended for farriers, and equips them with the skills to help them produce original research into farriery.

On July, all but one of the students attended the official graduation ceremony at Royal Festival Hall, London, graduating alongside more than 250 fellow RVC students.

Over the past two and a half years, the students steadily built up their study and research skills, leading to the design, writing and implementation of their own research projects. As well as being significant personal accomplishments, the findings from their projects represent huge learning opportunities for the farriery and veterinary communities.

All had to work hard to balance their studies with their jobs and family lives. The Equine Locomotor Research (ELR) team at the RVC are proud of their achievements, and of the effort they put in.

Dr Thilo Pfau leads the Applied Equine Locomotion module of the diploma, with deputy course director Amy Barstow. © Royal Veterinary College

Many of the ELR graduates have caught the ‘research bug,’ with several hoping to continue their studies in order to achieve the Fellowship of the Worshipful Company of Farriers, including farrier Jim Ravenscroft.

He said the Graduate Diploma allowed him to broaden his experience, and to learn from some of the country’s leading researchers whilst completing a dissertation that could be used towards the fellowship – “it was far too good an opportunity to miss”.

“I have learned so much about the whole process of research and this has given me the confidence to question a lot in my everyday work,” Ravenscroft said.

Amy Barstow, Deputy Course Director, said: “It was a pleasure to work with these students to help them tackle research questions that they had ruminated over for many years, and I am excited to see how our new graduates take these skills into their daily work and beyond.”

Peter Day, one of the diploma graduates, added: “I’ve waited for a course like this for 20 years, and to graduate with such great peers was a real privilege.”

Applications for the Graduate Diploma in Equine Locomotor Research course commencing in January 2020 in the USA are now open. 

The next intake for the UK based course will be in 2021.

Computed tomography images showing hoof deformation with a packer in the unloaded (grey) and the foot simulating trot (orange) as seen from behind (left) and the side (right).
Computed tomography images showing hoof deformation with a packer in the unloaded (grey) and the foot simulating trot (orange) as seen from behind (left) and the side (right). © Royal Veterinary College

 

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