$50,000 grant offered for equine therapy research

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A graduate student from Texas A&M University collecting data wirelessly for the kinematics study, funded by the Horses and Humans Research Foundation (HHRF). 
A graduate student from Texas A&M University collecting data wirelessly for a kinematics study, funded by the Horses and Humans Research Foundation (HHRF). © Pilwon Hur/Texas A&M

A $50,000 grant is being offered this year for researchers investigating the therapeutic effects of horses on humans by the Horses and Humans Research Foundation (HHRF).

The HHRF’s goal is to to support scientific research that explores the claimed, yet unsubstantiated
benefits of equine-assisted activities and therapies.

It has funded twelve equine-assisted activities projects in as many years, and 10 projects have been completed. Three of the awarded projects studied Cerebral Palsy/movement/balance, three on post-traumatic stress disorder, three on autism, one regarding children with bonding issues, one on the horse’s response to physical/cognitive disorders and one on evaluating the impact of the dynamic surface of the moving horse on its rider. Ten articles related to these projects have been published
in scientific journals.

Grants are selected on a competitive basis, taking into account scientific merit, scientific and clinical significance and relevance. Preference will be given to investigators with solid credentials and research experience. All applications undergo a four-tier review process completed by the scientific review committee. The average grant award is $50,000 for up to a 1.5 year period.

Submissions for the latest grant offering close on June 30.

Among the latest grants awarded by the HHRF is $10,000 late last year to Texas A&M University for Tracking Kinematic and Kinetic Data during Horse Riding for Optimizing Therapeutic Outcomes.
This study will investigate the impact the movement of a horse has on the rider by measuring both horse and rider simultaneously.

The project relies on new, technologically advanced sensors, to be placed on both rider and horse, to collect data on the movements experienced by the rider while on the dynamic surface of the horse.

Information for applicants, including application materials, previously funded projects, review guidelines and more are available at horsesandhumans.org.

 

 

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