Germany adds another team dressage gold to European Champs tally

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Denmark's Anna Zibrandtsen and Arlando. 
Denmark’s Anna Zibrandtsen and Arlando. © FEI/Claes Jakobsson

Germany has followed up its Rio 2016 Olympic team victory to claim its 23rd dressage team title at the Longines FEI European Championships.

Already in the lead after the first two team-members completed their Grand Prix tests on the first day in Gothenburg, Sweden, they inched ever-closer to that top step of the podium when Sonke Rothenberger, 22, took his turn with Cosmo on Wednesday night. This is a partnership that has matured splendidly, and such was the quality of their work that they were trending with a score over 80% early in their test, eventually posting 78.343 to become the new leaders despite a spooky moment and a mistake in the tempi changes.

Helen Langehanenberg and Damsey FRH.
Helen Langehanenberg and Damsey FRH. © FEI/Claes Jakobsson

Rothenberger’s score brought the German total to 227.915, so victory was already well within their grasp long before anchor rider Isabell Werth, 45, came into the ring. Meantime, a fierce battle was raging between neighbours Denmark and Sweden for silver and bronze, with that result finally sealed by a very special performance from Denmark’s Cathrine Dufour. Riding the 14-year-old Atterupgaards Cassidy whom she has partnered since her junior years, the 25-year-old sparkled for a score of 78.300 which put the result beyond doubt.

Denmark had not been on a European medal podium since 2001 so there was plenty to celebrate along with team-mates Anna Kasprzak, Anna Zibrandtsen and Agnete Kirk Thinggaard. And for Sweden it was their fourth team bronze, and Rose Mathisen, Tinne Vilhelmson Silfven, Therese Nilshagen and Patrik Kittel were all riding horses that still have something to learn so Chef d’Equipe, Bo Jena, rightly admitted to feeling “really proud” of them.

Tinne Vilhelmson Silfvén (Sweden) and Paridon Magi. 
Tinne Vilhelmson Silfvén (Sweden) and Paridon Magi. © FEI/Claes Jakobsson

Carl Hester (Nip Tuck) made a valiant effort to claw back a podium place for the beleaguered British who were always compromised once reduced to a three-member side, and his score of 74.900 placed him individually fifth but Team GB finished two percentage places behind the Swedish bronze medallists while the defending champions from The Netherlands lined up fifth.

Last to ride into the ring, it was only a matter of putting the icing on the German cake as Olympic silver medallists Isabell Werth and her fabulous mare Weihegold swaggered their way through a lovely test that demoted team-mate Rothenberger to runner-up spot in the individual rankings while Denmark’s Dufour finished third and Germany’s Helen Langehanenberg and Dorothee Schneider slotted into fourth and six spots respectively. The top 30 riders now go through to the Grand Prix Special for the individual medals.

Chef d'Equipe Klaus Roeser with the gold medal winning German Dressage team: Isabell Werth, Dorothee Schneider, Helen Langehanenberg and Sonke Rothenberger after winning the Longines FEI European Championships 2017 in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Chef d’Equipe Klaus Roeser with the gold medal winning German Dressage team: Isabell Werth, Dorothee Schneider, Helen Langehanenberg and Sonke Rothenberger after winning the Longines FEI European Championships 2017 in Gothenburg, Sweden. © FEI/Liz Gregg

Individual result (in the team competition):
1. Weihegold OLD (Isabell Werth) GER – 83.743
2. Cosmo (Sonke Rothenberger) GER – 78.343
3. Atterupgaards Cassidy (Cathrine Dufour) DEN – 78.300

Final Team result:
1. Germany – 237.072
2. Denmark – 224.643
3. Sweden – 221.143

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