USA’s McLain Ward claims PanAm Games jumping gold

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Pan American Games individual gold medalist McLain Ward (USA) and Rothchild.
Pan American Games individual gold medalist McLain Ward (USA) and Rothchild. © FEI/StockImageServices.com

The USA’s McLain Ward clinched individual gold in jumping at the Pan-American Games 2015 in Caledon Park, Toronto, Canada on Saturday night.

Thursday’s team tussle was an intriguing battle that proved unpredictable to the end when Argentina filled silver medal spot ahead of the USA in bronze. And it continued in the same vein when the individual medals were decided in a two-way jump-off for gold and silver as well as a five-way race for the bronze. Venezuela’s Andres Rodriguez went head-to-head with Ward, and although he had to settle for silver his result reflected the consistent theme of the week. The quality of the sport in the region has improved beyond recognition in recent years, and the normally dominant sides had to fight very hard indeed to claim their fair share of the spoils.

On the podium for the individual Jumping medal presentation at the Pan-American Games 2015 in Caledon Park, Toronto, Canada this evening: (L to R) silver medallist Andres Rodriguez (VEN), gold medallist McLain Ward (USA) and bronze medallist Lauren Hough (USA).
On the podium for the individual Jumping medal presentation at the Pan-American Games 2015 in Caledon Park, Toronto, Canada, from left, silver medalist Andres Rodriguez (VEN), gold medalist McLain Ward (USA) and bronze medalist Lauren Hough (USA). © FEI/StockImageServices.com

Olympic qualification was also hanging in the balance since the action began last Tuesday, and it was Canada and Argentina that claimed the two team berths for Rio 2016 while two individual qualifying spots were earned by both Colombia and Venezuela, and one each by Uruguay and Peru.

The individual final was a nail-biter that went right to the wire, and Argentina’s Jose Larocca Jr (Cornet du Lys) was one of just three, from a starting field of 35, who returned a zero score in the first round to leave him on level-pegging with McLain Ward and Venezuela’s Andres Rodriguez. But a mistake in the second round saw the Argentinian battle it out in the five-way jump-off for bronze that took place between all the four-fault riders before the final contest for silver and gold began.

And Larocca was pushed off the medal podium when the USA’s Lauren Hough added nothing to her first-round error with Ohlala to take the bronze.

“I had to fight hard for it!” Hough said after producing the only clear of this jump-off. “For my horse this was her first Championships but she’s done events like Aachen and she seems to get better as the week progresses. I would say the fault I had in the first round, I was too polite at the double planks, but I had a nice position in the jump-off, the three ahead of me had rails down but the one behind was a quick horse so I took a bit of a risk” she explained.

Venezuela’s Rodriguez led the way in the jump-off for gold, and left the door open when racing home with Darlon van Groenhove in the fast time of 39.45 seconds, but leaving one element of the double on the floor.

“I was a bit too careful at the first part and had the back part of it. I was very fast because I knew McLain was coming behind, so I risked a bit,” he explained. Ward kept a cool head to return a clear in 42.89 to take the individual title, admitting that, as so often happens, luck played a part in the end result.

“My game plan was to ride the first five fences fast to try to win it two ways – if I had a fence down I would still be fast enough – and I was lucky at the last (fence), I gave that a bit of a rattle. But I’ve never won a big one without a little bit of good fortune!” said the 39-year-old three-time Olympian.

The course was created by Canadian course designer Michel Vaillancourt, individual silver medalist at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.

Ward said he knew the courses would get bigger as the week progressed, and that would suit his horse, Rothchild. “He’s a blood horse and a stamina test suits him, but today I knew I couldn’t make a mistake – it was a tough day’s work!” he said.

Ward was also on the winning US team at the previous Pan-American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico in 2011 where he also finished individually fourth.

Impressive debut for Venezualan teenager

Emanuel Andrade, 18, of Venezuela placed sixth following a jump-off for the individual bronze medal in his Pan American Games debut
Emanuel Andrade, 18, of Venezuela placed sixth following a jump-off for the individual bronze medal in his Pan American Games debut. © Starting Gate Photography

In his Pan American Games debut, Emanuel Andrade of Venezuela was one of five riders in the jump-off for individual bronze.

Following two rounds of competition, Andrade, 18, was tied with four other riders on a score of four faults.  Riding Hardrock Z, a 12-year-old Zangersheide stallion (Heartbreaker x Carthago Z), Andrade incurred one rail in the first round before returning to jump clear in the second round.

In the jump-off, Andrade incurred one rail for four faults, with his time of 43.46 seconds placing him sixth overall in the final standings.

“It was big enough and difficult,” said Andrade of the courses.  “I am very happy.  My horse jumped great.”

Andrade made his major games debut last year when, at the age of 17, he competed at the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games in Normandy, France, as a member of the Venezuelan Team.  Comparing his experience at the two championship events, Andrade said, “It is the same height, but I feel more secure in what I am doing.  I think the horse is more ready, too.

“We have a lot of opportunity going forward, and at the next games I am going to be more ready and maybe get a medal,” Andrade said.  “It was an amazing experience!”

Ian Millar was the highest placing Canadian rider, finishing in 16th place.
Ian Millar was the highest placing Canadian rider, finishing in 16th place. © FEI/StockImageServices.com

In his record tenth Pan American Games appearance, Ian Millar emerged as the highest-placed Canadian. Riding Dixson, a 12-year-old bay Belgian Warmblood gelding (Vigo d’Arsouilles x Olisco), Millar incurred eight faults in the opening round.  The pair improved to a four fault effort in the second round.

With a final score of 13 faults over two rounds, Millar ended his tenth Pan American Games bid tied in 16th position.

“I said to the team that it was a good thing we got a medal on Thursday!” said Millar, 68, who was the Pan Am Champion in 1987 and 1999.  “When we come to these things, the team event is the most important thing.  That’s what we want is the team result.  It’s what we need for the Olympic qualification.  That was the big job.  It doesn’t mean that we let down today, it just didn’t happen.

“The horse executed everything just fine, all of the problems, but he happened to have a couple of rails,” continued Millar of Dixson’s performance.  “Am I disappointed?  Yes. But I love the horse and he’s given us a great Pan American Games. It just wasn’t our day.”

Fellow Canadian rider Yann Candele finished 19th with a two-round total score of 16 faults.  Riding Showgirl, a 15-year-old chestnut selle francais mare (Gold de Becourt x Elf III), Candele incurred eight faults in both rounds.

Eric Lamaze had an unexpected stop on course during the first round riding Coco Bongo.  As the pair entered the opening element of the triple combination at fence 11, Coco Bongo hung up in the air, coming down on the back rail.  As a result, they could not make the distance to the ‘b’ element.  The eight jumping faults and two time penalties left Lamaze in 22nd position individually, just missing the cut for the second round.

“He clearly backed away in the air, I don’t know if he was looking at something or if he was being extra-careful as the course went on, but he backed away in the air and, at that point, it was over,” said Lamaze of the 10-year-old bay Rheinlander stallion (Caretino x Calido). “It’s disappointing and it’s not. I think the mistake came from having a lot of quality.  It’s not a horse that is scared, just a horse that is extremely careful.  He wasn’t sure how to solve that triple and he held himself back.”

Additional reporting: Jennifer Ward, Jessie Christie

Result:

Individual: GOLD – Rothchild (McLain Ward) USA 0/0/0 42.89; SILVER – Darlon van Groenhove (Andres Rodriguez) 0/0/4 39.45; BRONZE – Ohlala (Lauren Hough) USA 4/0/0 42.15.

Team results

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