Scholarships for two Cornell equine veterinary students

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Two Cornell University veterinary students have been awarded scholarships by the Thoroughbred Education and Research Foundation (TERF).

Designed to assist students of promise to prepare for careers in equine medicine and surgery, the scholarships were awarded to Jesse Tyma and Daniel Jackson, and are designed to assist promising students to prepare for careers in equine medicine and surgery, as well as helping TERF realize its mission to support and promote equine education and research.

The TERF’s endowment fund is chaired by Dr James Orsini, Associate Professor of Surgery and Director of the Laminitis Institute at the University of Pennsylvania, and Herb Moelis, whose Moelis Family Foundation is involved in granting funds to charities involved in medical research, animal welfare, and children’s causes. He also serves on the Board of Directors of Thoroughbred Charities of America.

Katherine M. Edmondson, Assistant Dean for Learning and Instruction at Cornell’s veterinary college, said the TERF Scholarships made a meaningful impact on talented students, who will contribute a great deal to the veterinary profession across the span of their careers. “The scholarships provide invaluable financial assistance to our students and the encouragement to pursue opportunities that might otherwise be out of reach. We are very grateful to TERF for their support,” she said.

Daniel Jackson, a member of the college’s Class of 2013, has focused his attention in the areas of large animal medicine, field service, and epidemiological research. To strengthen his clinical skills training, he logged more than 1000 hours as a veterinary student technician in Cornell’s Equine and Farm Animal Hospitals. After graduation, he hopes to continue these interests through a combination of clinical practice and research, with a focus on agricultural animal disease, and ecosystem health.

Tyma, a member of the Class of 2014 who will begin an internship at Rhinebeck Equine after graduation, is interested in a number of specialty areas within equine medicine: emergency surgery, sports medicine, diagnostic imaging, ophthalmology, neurology, and complementary medicine. She aspires to develop innovative rehabilitative therapies to help treat horses suffering from traumatic performance injuries.

Jackson, a member of the college’s Class of 2013, has focused his attention in the areas of large animal medicine, field service, and epidemiological research. To strengthen his clinical skills training, he logged more than 1,000 hours as a veterinary student technician in Cornell’s Equine and Farm Animal Hospitals. After graduation, he hopes to continue these interests through a combination of clinical practice and research, with a focus on agricultural animal disease, and ecosystem health.

“The scholarship program is one of our most rewarding initiatives,” said Orsini. “Offering scholarships to Cornell students assures us that the recipients are the best trained and prepared for equine primary care or postgraduate training upon graduation.

“Our goal is to support as many worthy students as possible in veterinary medicine across the United States, and our expectation is to do more.”

www.TERF.info

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