Horror horse injury sparks call for fireworks ban

November 11, 2009

by Neil Clarkson


The injuries suffered by the arabian stallion Prestige after he was spooked by fireworks last week.

A woman whose Arab stallion suffered a terrible side wound on Guy Fawkes night says it is time to ban fireworks.

Jackie Chamberlain wants to start a nationwide petition to bring an end to the fireworks that terrify horses, other farm animals and pets around the country.

Her stallion, Prestige, suffered a massive wound to his side when he smashed his way through a post-and-rail fence to escape fireworks last Thursday on Guy Fawkes night, probably just after nightfall.

Jackie told Horsetalk that Prestige, 17, is her quietest horse.

"He ended up out on the busy Morrinsville/Hamilton Highway.

"He found his way into someone's paddock 1 kilometre down the road and was discovered there early the next morning. Luckily, these people had the good sense to call a vet and go searching for the owner."

The attending vet told Jackie that Prestige will take many months to heal. Dying flesh had to be stripped from the wound. Less than a centimetre of flesh now covers the vital organs in the area.

Jackie says it is time for a ban. She says Guy Fawkes is a horror for both animals and animal lovers of any type.

"I wonder how many others there are," she said, referring to the injury suffered by Prestige. "It's not just horses. It's all animals.


Prestige just days before the accident.
"I know we have been able to quell the amount of fireworks that have been sold, but even now we are still hearing them."

Jackie, who runs Butterbur Stud, said Prestige grazed on a leased block at Newstead, just outside Hamilton. He has lived there for four years. The horses that graze there are checked up to three times a day. The area is becoming increasingly built up.

Jackie herself lives near Cambridge, on a dairy farm, and has about eight horses in total.

She believes fireworks should be limited to public displays and that private sales should be banned once and for all. She said she would appreciate any support in her efforts.

She says fireworks terrify cats and dogs, some of whom are prescibed valium to see them through the ordeal.

As for Prestige, he is on the home block for his long recuperation. Jackie says he was an endurance horse who has done his share of community work. For several years she rode him around their Cambridge neighbourhood to collect for the IHC.