November 20, 2007


Horses in transit in a double-decker truck.
Picture: ILPH

The International League for the Protection of Horses (ILPH) has launched a new campaign to end the long distance transport of horses to slaughter in Europe.

The campaign, named Make A Noise, aims to highlight the plight of the 100,000 horses who are carted into and across Europe every year - forced to endure unnecessary journeys that can take up to four days, only to be slaughtered when they reach their destination. Ultimately, the ILPH would like to see slaughter at source and long distance transport to slaughter replaced with a carcase only trade, meaning just the meat is transported to areas of demand.

The Make A Noise website, which goes live this week, provides information on the campaign, including hard facts about the trade; what the ILPH is striving to achieve; and case studies of horses that the team witnessed during their field trip in August. Most importantly it provides supporters with ways to get involved in the campaign, from taking direct action to fundraising.

Jo White, Director of Campaigns and Communications comments: "Now is the right time for people to get involved in our campaign. We have reached a critical stage which brings us closer than ever before to seeing an end to this trade. We have been overwhelmed by offers of support but need more people to sign up to our campaign to demonstrate the sheer number of people that will not tolerate this suffering."

Long distance transport to slaughter is Europe's biggest single abuse of horses. Overstocking of lorries, failure to stop for rest, food and water and loading animals that are not fit for travel are common contraventions of EU laws that see many thousands of horses suffer for no good reason.

By signing up to Make A Noise anyone who is concerned about the welfare of animals can have a positive impact on this unnecessary trade and help the ILPH to achieve its aims:

  1. Achieving rigorous enforcement of EU Regulation (EC) No 1/2005 by all EU Member States and thereby improving the conditions for slaughter horses.
  2. Seeing journey limits put back onto the political agenda so horses are slaughtered at source and do not have to endure these journeys .
  3. Ultimately, achieving an end to long distance transport of horses to slaughter in Europe, replacing it with a carcase only trade.